The Vikings Are Back

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Producer Daniel Guia & Anders Kongshaug, vnr.TV
Length: 2.46 Source: VisitDenmark, vnr.TV Access: FREE

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The Vikings are back
1000 years ago, Danish Viking King Sweyn Forkbeard invaded London and became King of England and now Vikings sailed up the Thames again and, with London Bridge in the background, returned the money and drank mead.

The money was given to make the Vikings leave.

1000 years ago, Danish Viking King Sweyn Forkbeard invaded London, overthrew Ethelred the Unready and became King of England. To mark this millennium, Vikings embarked their Viking ship at St Katharine Docks today, having come over from Denmark – not to invade the Docks but to drink peace and hand back tokens of the ‘Danegeld’ in the form of special gold coins.

2014 is something to look forward to because Denmark and England are staging a series of spectacular new exhibitions and events across both England and Denmark, recreating a real taste for authentic Viking life and culture.

Highlights include the first major exhibition on Vikings at the British Museum for over 30 years.

The new major exhibition ‘VIKING’ from the Danish National Museum in Copenhagen which is transferred to the British Museum in London in March 2014  will include the latest viking findings, such as large hoards of gold and silver found in England, jewellery from Russia, coins traded from the Middle East and found in Scotland, as well as weapons from across Scandinavia. Also the surviving timbers of a 37-metre-long Viking warship, the longest ever found and never seen before in the UK.

Danish Viking King Sweyn Forkbeard, who also overthrew his own father, Harold Bluetooth Gormsson, the King of Denmark, was able to attack villages and religious communities in England without meeting too much resistance. Much of the time, the English paid the Danes money to save their land from being ravaged and this money is known as Danegeld. In 994, with a huge fleet of 94 ships, Sweyn sailed up the Thames to plunder England. London put up a good defence and drove the Vikings back so Forkbeard moved his forces south to attack the south-east coast and to plunder whatever he could find. Sweyn’s attacks on England continued for ten years until 1013 when he invaded London with his son Cnut and took control of the country.

The extraordinary Viking expansion from the Scandinavian homelands created a cultural network with contacts from the Caspian Sea to the North Atlantic, and from the Arctic Circle to the Mediterranean. The Vikings will be viewed in a global context that will highlight the multi-faceted influences arising from extensive cultural contacts

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SHOTLIST
00:00 – 00:27 – Various shots of rowing Vikings

00:27 – 00:38 – Viking passes on some gold and leaves boat

00:38 – 00:45 – Introduction shots of Ambassador

00:45 – 01:08 – Claus Gruber, Danish Ambassador to the United Kingdom:
“ Exactly one thousand years ago, this December, is when Forkbeard was crowned King of England, and we come now in peace with a group of Vikings who will give back some of the Danegeld that we took at that time. We do that in order to show that we come in peace and in order to celebrate the common heritage between our two countries.”

01:08 – 01:28 – Various shots of Vikings with gold

01:28 – 01:54 – Various shots of Vikings giving gold back to Londoners

01:54 – 02:17 –  Henrik Kahn, Director – VisitDenmark UK:
“In the coming  year there’s a lot of things going on concerning Vikings. In spring, the National Museum of Denmark is taking a big exhibition to the British Museum and a lot of fun and exciting things can be seen in Denmark. Lots of places where you can go and really see the genuine Viking treasures.”

02:17 – 02:26 – Viking trying to blow horn

02:26 – 02:44 – Vikings drinking peace
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Extra info:
Viking Kings of England – a brief historical account

Sweyn Forkbeard was the King of Denmark and he also became King of England for a short period of time. Sweyn was also the father of Cnut the Great who also became King of England. In 988 Sweyn overthrew his own father, Harold Bluetooth Gormsson,

c. Sweyn then led a large number of raids along the east and south coasts of England. England was a rich country and the Danes were able to attack villages and religious communities without meeting too much resistance. Much of the time the English paid the Danes money to save their land from being ravaged and this money is known as Danegeld. In 994, with a huge fleet of 94 ships, Sweyn sailed into the Thames estuary along with the Norwegian Olaf Trygvasson to plunder England. London put up a good defence and drove the Vikings back so Forkbeard moved his forces south to attack the south-east coast and to plunder whatever he could find. Sweyn’s attacks on England continued for ten years until 1013 when he invaded London with his son Cnut and took control of the country. The English King, Aethelred, along with his wife and sons were forced to flee to Normandy for their own safety. Sweyn was King of England for only a few months before he died in February of 1014. After Sweyn’s death, Cnut left England and Aethelred returned from Normandy to reclaim the English throne.

 

BP exhibition ‘Vikings: life and legend’ at British Museum

New discoveries and research have led to a wealth of new information, and our understanding of Viking society is developing all the time. The achievements of the Vikings went far beyond the familiar image of violent raiders. Even so, the fact that it is now a thousand years since the whole of England was conquered by a Danish king this important period in our shared history.”

At the centre of the BP exhibition ‘Vikings: life and legend’ will be the surviving timbers of a 37-metre-long Viking warship, the longest ever found and never seen before in the UK. The ship dates from around AD 1025, the high point of the Viking Age when England, Denmark, Norway and possibly parts of Sweden were united under the rule of Cnut the Great. The extraordinary Viking expansion from the Scandinavian homelands created a cultural network with contacts from the Caspian Sea to the North Atlantic, and from the Arctic Circle to the Mediterranean. The Vikings will be viewed in a global context that will highlight the multi-faceted influences arising from extensive cultural contacts. Visitors will also see a number of unique objects and new finds, such as large hoards of gold and silver found in England, jewellery from Russia, coins traded from the Middle East and found in Scotland as well as weapons from across Scandinavia.

Yours Sincerely
Anders Kongshuag
+45  23103058

NB
For detailed info reg. the events, please contact:
Kathrine Lind Gustavussen at VisitDenmark at  klg@visitdenmark.com

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